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REGISTER NOW TO GET YOUR MANUSCRIPT READY FOR PUBLICATION!

Writers, have you written a short story? A column for a newspaper? How about a pretty good poem? A novel? Do you think your work is good enough for a publisher or agent to look at it?

If you’ve never attended a writers’ conference, you have no idea what you’re missing. It’s one of the first and most important steps you can take to become a published writer.  There’s so much to know … and learn about the writing/publishing business.

This July 16th to the 21st at the 28th Montrose Christian Writers Conference, we have an excellent line-up of faculty members who will help you with writing skills, promotion, poetry, picture books, editing, agenting, finding a publisher, and a host of other essential information. Besides three WIPs and four Major Morning Seminars, we also are offering 43 afternoon classes to help you hone your manuscript or find that publisher:

AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

 

Indie Publishing vs. Royalty Publishing. What’s New?

(Faculty Panel Discussion)

Why Drama?

Formatting before Beginning

Fiction: Character Building (Part One)

21 Ways to Overcome Writers Block

Get the Most out of the Conference

 The Art of Collaborative Writing

Fiction: Character Building (Part Two)

Conducting High Profile Interviews 

Blogging 101

Creating a Viable Stage Production

Shock the Clock: Time Management

Marketing for Writers Who Don’t Like to  Market

Seeing Through the Eyes of a Child

Powerful Sentence Structures

Fiction: Setting and Description

Write for your Life

Prayer in the Life of a Writer

Creative Blockbusters

Making your Fiction Matter

Writing for Parenting Magazines

Blogging 102

Format and Performance Know-how

Writing Compelling Devotions

No Market for your Book? What to Do

Putting Characters in Place

PUGS Specifics for Christian Writers

Writing for Guideposts and the Guideposts Contest

Graduation Time; What’s Next?

Bible Studies that Sell

Real “Artist-Ship”

Aspects of the Editing Process

Breaking into Anthologies

Social Media 101

Sharing the Fun of Drama

Column Writer as a Platform Builder

Peace in the Literary Storm

Writing for Picture: Magazine or Picture Book for Children?

Understanding the Business of Writing for Publication

Selling Personal Experience Short Stories

What’s an Edit?

Irresistible Queries and Proposals

Proofread with Excellence

Writing the Profile Piece

To check out the weekly schedule and the faculty members offering these classes, please go to http://www.montrosebible.org/OurEvents/tabid/113/page_550/1/eventid_550/58/Default.aspx

I hope to see you at Montrose in July!

Marsha, Director

 

 

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READY TO REGISTER FOR THE 2017 MCWC?

The Montrose Christian Writers Conference is pleased to announce that our new online registration system is now open. If you plan to come, especially for the Work-in-Progress Seminars, don’t delay registering. Those WIPs have enrollment limitations.

[Printed versions of the brochure and registration form are also available. Call the office (570-278-1001) to have a brochure mailed to your home address.]

To register online you will need to go to our website http://www.montrosebible.org/OurEvents/tabid/113/page_550/1/eventid_550/58/Default.aspx

and follow the directions below to access the online registration system. You will need to have a login which may be used now and in the future to sign up for programs at Montrose Bible Conference.

TO BEGIN:

  1. 1. Click on the LINK above to go to our web page. Find the link for online registration. When you get to the Login page, click on the button that reads “Create New Account.”
  2. The first screen is where you set up your username and password. The name and email address is for yours, not the person you are registering. Keep the username and password in a secure place and use it whenever you wish to return to update information, register for other sessions, or make a payment.
  3. When you click “next,” you will be asked for the name of the person you are registering. Listed below are those persons from your family in our database based on the address. When you are asked for the name of the person to be registered, if the person is listed in the table below, you should enter the first and last name and the birth date exactly as listed below to be connected to that person. Enter the information as shown below even if it is wrong. If the name or birth date is wrong, send an email to mbc@MontroseBible.org and ask to have the information corrected.

Name

Birthdate

  1. Once you have entered and confirmed the information, click NEXT, and you will be taken through each screen in the registration process.
  2. If you are registering more than one person, complete the registration for the first person and then click on “Add Camper.”
  3. When you have entered all the registrations, you can make payment and complete your registration(s).

If you experience any difficulties during the registration process, you will see a Contact Us button at the top of the screen that includes the technical support phone number and the camp phone number. Call if you need assistance.

We are excited about the registration process and the capabilities provided to you both to register now, to update information later, and to make payments at your convenience.

Montrose Bible Conference

mbc@MontroseBible.org

570-278-1001

www.MontroseBible.org

I look forward to seeing you there in July!

Marsha

Director

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MCWC FACULTY SPOTLIGHT – AUTHOR/EDITOR B.J. TAYLOR

Writers, the brochures and online registration will be ready any day now for the 2017 Montrose Christian Writers Conference. One of the outstanding faculty members scheduled is B.J. Taylor flying all the way from California to present one of the Major Morning 4-Session Series: “The Journey to Publishing Nonfiction.”

ALL ABOUT B.J.

B.J. Taylor is a recipient of the Pacesetter Award from the Mount Hermon Christian Writers Conference and truly believes in never giving up. It took her eight years, but she finally succeeded in winning a spot at the Guideposts Writers Workshop in 2004. Her published work includes many stories in Guideposts, Angels on Earth, Chicken Soup for the Soul, and countless other publications including John Gray’s Mars and Venus in Love and Writer’s Digest. She’s the author of a memoir: Charlie Bear: What a Headstrong Rescue Dog Taught Me about Life, Love, and Second Chances. (I highly recommend this book. It’s one of my favorites!)

B.J. represents Guideposts, Angels on Earth, and Mysterious Ways magazines as well as Inspiring Voices, the self-publishing arm of Guideposts books. She can read advance manuscript submissions and will help to guide and instruct through her many years of experience as a Guideposts writer as well as offer guidance to authors who wish to publish with Inspiring Voices.

B.J. has 40 stories in print in Chicken Soup and loves to teach her easy-to-remember formula for crafting inspirational short stories that sell. If you’re serious about becoming a published author and want to learn how to craft well-written true stories, check out her book written just for you based on the successful classes she has taught for the past ten years: P MS to a T: the winning formula for writing nonfiction short stories that sell.

B.J. instructs at numerous conferences around the United States, from Washington to Florida to California. She has been a Keynote Speaker, a Mentoring Instructor, a Hands-On Nonfiction Class leader, and loves to help writers at all stages of their writing career.

HER OTHER TWO CLASSES AT MCWC:

Writing for Guideposts and the Guideposts Contest

B.J. Taylor will share the nuts and bolts you need to know to write a winning Guideposts story along with how to properly submit, who to submit to, what to include, and when to send it in for the Guideposts Writers Workshop Contest held every other year. Thousands will enter; only 12 writers are chosen for the all-expenses paid opportunity of a lifetime. In 2014 two of the winners came from a conference where B.J. divulged her tips and tricks. Don’t miss out on the knowledge, experience, and secrets B.J. will share as a winner of a coveted spot in 2004.

Make $$$ Selling Personal Experience Short Stories

Want to know the formula for writing inspirational stories that sell? B.J. Taylor’s career includes selling four articles to Writer’s Digest, two dozen stories to Guideposts and Angels on Earth, and 40 stories to Chicken Soup for the Soul, along with sales to many other publications. Numerous writers have learned B.J.’s secret formula, submitted to Chicken Soup and Guideposts, and are now published authors. Learn how to make money in your writing career.

B.J. lives in Southern California with her husband and rescue dog Charlie Bear, who writes a column for “American Pet Magazine” (with a little help from his Mom Peep).

Learn more about B.J. at http://www.bjtaylor.com. You can also sign up for her blog and newsletter right from the website.

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MCWC is just a few months away. If you’re writing nonfiction, B.J. is the one to review your work!

I hope to see you there!

Marsha

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The Nametag

Diane Stark

When I was eight years old, my mom “caught” me sitting on the floor in my closet with a purple pen and a spiral bound notebook. When she asked me what I was doing, I sighed and admitted, “Mom, I’ve been writing.”

When I was in fifth grade, I won the Young Author’s Fair at school. My story was terrible and slightly plagiarized, I think. At the end of the story, the villain melted because of the rain, and as his body became a glob of ooze on the ground, he groaned, “I melted because I’m so sweet.”  I stole this.  My mother used to say that to my siblings and me when we fussed about carrying in groceries while it was raining. “You’re not going to melt,” she’d say. “Only sugar cubes are that sweet.”

Plagiarizing a story from your own mother isn’t sweet at all.

Clearly, my roots as a writer are iffy at best. My childhood included lots of closet hiding, spiral-bound notebooks, and, apparently, theft of my mother’s intellectual property.

As a high school senior, I won college scholarships because of essays I’d written. But never for a second did I consider journalism as a major. Writing for a career? That was way too risky.

I majored in education and taught elementary school for a decade. I loved it, and I’d like to think I was good at it, but it didn’t feed my soul. Not like writing did.

I wrote late at night when my husband and children were sleeping. I even sent some of my stories to editors, and a few of them got published.

But I never told anyone.

I loved writing, and I didn’t want anyone to steal the joy I felt at doing it. So I kept it a secret.

Until I wanted to attend my first writers’ conference. I was nervous to tell my husband about it, but he encouraged me to go. So I did.

At the conference, they gave me a lanyard to wear. The tag read, “My name is Diane, and I am a writer.”

I gasped. What am I doing there? I’m not a writer, I thought. Not a real writer, anyway.

I put the lanyard around my neck, feeling like a liar.

That afternoon, I met with the editor of a small Christian publication. I sat across from him, my hands shaking. I handed him the stack of stories I’d brought and prepared to be embarrassed.

But instead of him saying, “These aren’t good enough,” he smiled and said, “These are terrific. Exactly what I’ve been looking for.”

“Really?” I said. “Because I’m not a real writer, you know. I’m just a mom.  I write at night when I think no one knows, but I’m pretty sure my husband has known all along.”

He chuckled. “A lot of us feel that way. We feel that struggle to be a ‘real’ writer. But have you seen your name tag?”

That editor, who is now my friend, gave me such a gift that day. He let me in on a little secret:  Becoming a writer isn’t about getting published.  It’s about writing.  It’s about doing the thing that God has called you to do.

I’m a writer, not because an editor likes my work, but because God created me to write.

Published or not, if you pick up a pen for the Kingdom, you are a writer.

Diane’s Topics for her Classes at

the 2017 Montrose Christian Writers Conference

July 16th – 21st

Breaking into Anthologies

Diane has been published in more than 35 Chicken Soup for the Soul books. She knows what types of stories sell to anthologies and can help others tell their personal stories in an effective, emotional way—exactly what the anthologies are looking for.

Writing for Parenting Magazines

Diane has five children and she regularly writes about her “expertise” as a parent in magazines like Focus on the Family.While she doesn’t claim to be a parenting expert, she does know that what works for her kids might work for other kids too.  She also knows that magazines will pay for these parenting tips.  Diane will teach participants how to use their own parenting “expertise” to break into parenting magazines.

Conducting High Profile Interviews

Christian magazines are always on the lookout for profile pieces about Christian celebrities. But how do writers get these interviews, and what do you ask in the interview? Diane has interviewed Christian musicians, NFL and NBA stars, as well as Christian actors and actresses. She will teach participants how to acquire high-profile interviews, what to ask during these coveted interviews, and even how to control your nerves.

Writing the Profile Piece

Profile pieces are among the most salable stories a freelancer can write. Diane will teach participants how to write this type of story after conducting an interview. Information will include choosing the best quotes from your notes, researching background information, and grabbing the readers’ attention from the start.

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Diane Stark has been a freelance writer for the last ten years. She has written for dozens of Christian magazines, including Focus on the Family, The Brink, Seek, War Cry, Teachers of Vision, Faith and Friends, and 35 Chicken Soup for the Soul books. She taught kindergarten for a decade before resigning to pursue a writing career. Diane is a bubbly, enthusiastic encourager who teaches other writers from a “Here’s What I Did” standpoint. She will motivate and equip conferees to succeed at their own writing dreams.

 

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Plan to attend MCWC this July and get your manuscript ready for publication!

Registration forms will be out within the next few weeks.

Marsha

Director

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An Author’s Guide to Editing, Part One

Loving Tips From Love2edit

Darlene Catlett, Copy Editor

 

Fifteen years ago, while working for a small Christian ministry, I stumbled into editing. Someone handed me a newsletter and asked me to proofread it for typos. I must have pointed out some things of value, because I found myself being assigned to proofread ads and other marketing materials, and finally I was asked to proofread a book. As I gained experience over time, my knowledge and skills grew, and I came to realize that I love to edit.

Is it true that writers consider writing to be the fun part and editing to be the boring part? I’ve heard that editing is the way to turn bland content into a work of art, or milk into ice cream!

As an editor, my perspective is different than yours. In order to sweeten the idea of editing, I put together a few editing tips for you. One of them may be just what you’re looking for!

  1. Let it be. Allow time in your schedule to write one day and edit the next. Or perhaps you can write in the morning and edit at night. If your deadline is too close to do either of those, at least get up out of your chair, walk away, and do something that will take your mind off your writing for a few minutes.
  2. Pretend someone else wrote it. If you have the luxury of setting your writing aside for several days, it may seem like someone else actually did write it!
  3. Round two. For larger works, edit in more than one sitting.
  4. Use highlights as you edit. Start out by highlighting everything. When a section is good to go, eliminate the highlight.
  5. Slash and save. When you edit out a thought, phrase, or illustration, save it somewhere to be used later. Create one document of slashed ideas and call it your Parking Lot.
  6. Read it out loud. Read it very quickly to see if there’s anything you stumble over. Read it slowly with slightly exaggerated expression as though you are reading it to a group of children. Read it to someone else and ask them to give you an honest critique.
  7. Don’t rely on spell check. So many mistakes slip through if you trust too much in technology to find your errors, i.e: though ≠ through ≠ thorough, my ≠ may, the ≠ they, must ≠ most.

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Please join me in one of the following workshops this July at the Montrose Christian Writers’ Conference to look at your writing from an editor’s perspective:

Aspects of the Editing Process

Let’s talk about what seems like top-secret information! Learn the difference between proofreading and copy editing and gain insight into the typical processes of a freelance editor and a publishing house. We’ll discover what it means to be “serious about editing… but not too serious to enjoy a good laugh over it!

Proofread with Excellence (Proofreaders’ Lingo)

In this lighthearted, hands-on workshop, we’ll have fun mastering all those puzzling proofreaders’ marks. As writers, you may see these marks during the pre-publication proofing stage, in style manuals, or from an editor prior to submitting your manuscript to an agent or publisher. Let’s decode some of the most useful ones together, and I’ll give you a tool that will save you time, should you have a need to use these markings in the future.

Darlene shares her joy of copy editing through various speaking events where attendees learn about her five C’s of copy-editing: to make the copy Clear, Correct, Concise, Comprehensible, and Consistent. Darlene lives by this motto: “I’m serious about editing… but not too serious to enjoy a good laugh over it!”

Learn more at http://www.love2edit.com

I hope to see you at Montrose this July!

Marsha, Director

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Montrose Christian Writers Conference Faculty Spotlight

Lora Zill

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Award-winning Poet

“If you want to become a better writer, write poetry because it teaches you to find just the right word.”

I heard that at my first writing conference 25 years ago from the keynote speaker. Since I’m a published poet and writer, and I edit and publish the Christian literary poetry journal “Time Of Singing,” I say, “AMEN!”

Writing poetry makes me a wordsmith. I come to think of words as individual markers of creativity that, when combined in a certain order, creates a work of art called a poem. Poetry teaches me to use language in all of its magic—its sensory imagery, sound, rhythm, the music of the line, and the paragraph, even white space, and yes, grammar and punctuation.

I carry the art and craft of poetry into my nonfiction. Great Christian writers such as Annie Dillard and Catherine Marshall wrote poetry, and you can see it in the sound and imagery in their prose. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. understood the power of poetry when he used images to drive home the great truths of the civil rights movement in his “Letter from the Birmingham Jail.” Abraham Lincoln used the cadences and sounds of language in his Gettysburg Address and Second Inaugural Address to create hope in the hearts of his people during and after the terrible cost of the Civil War.

So during my poetry classes at the Montrose Christian Writers Conference this summer, we’ll discuss the art and craft of poetry. We’ll play with words and generate ideas using everyday objects like paint chips, seed catalogs, stained glass, magazines, and word tiles. We’ll talk about what works, what doesn’t, and why, and how to achieve our writing goals. We’ll explore our creative pen and quillprocesses and discover new insights as we write and share.

Even if you write fiction or nonfiction, you’ll learn how to enhance and strengthen your work. Most of all, we’ll honor and affirm our creative lives in these classes. We will honor Jesus as the Root and Source of all our creativity.

I look forward to working with poets with all levels of the publishing experience.

Lora

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Lora will be teaching both a Major Morning series about poetry and will conduct a three-session afternoon poetry work-in-progress seminar this July at Montrose. Poets, plan to sign up for either or both of her classes. If you’re interested in working on your own poetry in the WIP seminar, sign up ASAP when the registration opens soon. That seminar is limited to six conferees.

Marsha

Director MCWC

 

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Should You Write a Bible Study?
By Gloria Penwell

Many authors and speakers eventually come to the decision that they could, or should, write a Bible study. For various reasons they believe the market needs what they have to offer. Sometimes the thought is I can write a Bible study better than anything out there, or I can’t find exactly what I’m looking for. My particular favorite reason that I hear is I’m much more spiritually mature than most of those other authors.

But what should be the motivation for writing a Bible study?

I believe that writing Bible studies must come out of a pressing sense that God wants an author to share his/her perspective on a particular subject or passage of scripture. Many times in our personal studies, we revert to one passage or concept that God keeps impressing on our hearts and minds. We study it. We do research it. We can’t let it go. That’s a good sign that maybe God wants us to write a certain Bible study.
Before we make that decision, though, it’s vital we spend time before the Father, asking him what he wants us to do. This very special subgenre needs to be verified by much prayer and the reading of God’s Word.

Who really needs another Bible study?

Another thing I suggest authors do is to ask other people if a certain topic or theme would be helpful to them. It might even be a good idea to teach it and see how it’s received. Sometimes the promptings we get from God are for our growth and don’t particularly apply to others. Will your Bible study help others in their Christian walk?
Writing Bible studies should be a deeply spiritual undertaking. Don’t ever approach it lightly.

Gloria Penwell
Acquisitions Editor
Bold Vision Books
http://www.Boldvisionbooks.com

Gloria will be presenting the following workshops this July at MCWC:

BIBLE STUDIES THAT SELL

GET THE MOST OUT OF THE CONFERENCE

PRAYER IN THE LIFE OF A WRITER

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