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Posts Tagged ‘author Marsha Hubler’

Writers! Join us for one of the few writers’ conferences being held during these uncertain times. The Montrose Christian Writers Conference is being held next week from Sunday, July 12th to Friday, July 17th in Montrose, PA. Following is information about a few of our faculty members. Go to  https://bit.ly/2TmCDDf for more details. 

2020 MCWC Faculty Spotlight

Dave Weiss, Annette Whipple, Karen Whiting, and Faculty Changes

ARTIST/AUTHOR/PASTOR DAVE WEISS

   Dave Weiss’ life was transformed by two events, someone introducing him to Jesus and someone showing how his art could be used to the glorify God. Today Dave is a pastor/speaker and the author/illustrator of 18 books, ranging from children’s books to non-fiction books on creative ministry.

DAVE’S KEYNOTE ADDRESS
SUNDAY EVENING

The Crimson Thread

Often we look at the Bible as a collection of books or stories, but what we sometimes fail to see is how the stories are a part of a larger narrative—God’s plan of redemption. In this session, Dave Weiss using art and storytelling will connect the dots with a crimson thread.

PASTOR DAVE’S TWO AFTERNOON CLASSES
              Mon. 2:30 – 3:15            

The Illustrated Book. Part 1: Pick the Pix

One of the great challenges of creating illustrated books is selecting what to illustrate, i.e. which pictures will give the story the greatest impact. Author/Illustrator Dave Weiss working from the manuscript from his children’s book, David’s Farm, will share his creative process in picking just the right illustrations. Authors may also bring their own manuscripts to discuss illustration possibilities.

                                              
Mon. 3:30 – 4:15
The Illustrated Book. Part 2: Prepping the Pix

In this workshop, Dave Weiss will show more of the illustration process, including planning the illustrations, thumbnails/story boarding, as well as illustration techniques, character design, placing the text, and formatting the finished page.

AUTHOR ANNETTE WHIPPLE

Annette Whipple celebrates curiosity and inspires a sense of wonder in readers and writers. She’s the author of five nonfiction children’s books, and this year The Laura Ingalls Wilder Companion: A Chapter-by-Chapter Guide (Chicago Review Press) and Whooo Knew? The Truth about Owls  (Reycraft Books) will be published. Annette also has experience writing magazine articles & Sunday school materials. She learned to love science & history during her years as an environmental educator & classroom teacher. Annette lives in Oxford, PA, with her husband & three children. 

ANNETTE’S CLASSES
 Mon. Thurs. 10:40 – 12:10

MAJOR MORNING CHILDREN’S NONFICTION

Want to share your knowledge and passion with children? This class dives deep into the nonfiction market for children—both in the Christian and general markets. Participants will explore the nonfiction writing process along with strategies, methods, and tools to improve writing and get published. We’ll study children’s informational texts to see how they’re similar and different. Hands-on activities will be included. This major morning class will equip you to write and inspire children’s curiosity.

AUTHOR KAREN WHITING

 Karen Whiting (www.karenwhiting.com) is an international speaker, former television host, and award-winning author of eighteen books. She has written more than six hundred articles for more than sixty publications. Currently. Karen writes for Leading Hearts Magazine and Molly Green Magazine. She writes for women, families, children, and the military. Best sellers include God’s Girls and My Princess Devotions.
Awards Karen has won:

Christian Retailing Best 2014, children’s nonfiction
AWSA Nonfiction Book of the Year
Awards: Military Writer Society of America Gold Medal, faith category

KAREN’S CLASSES

MAJOR MORNING: MARKETING YOUR BOOK

Whether you already have a book or are just beginning as a writer, learn the tools to develop your name. It’s never too early to start! Workshop will cover developing a portfolio, business card, brochure, store events, press kit, bio, web site, and products.

FACULTY CHANGES

Due to various reasons, several faculty members have had to bow out this year. However, our other fantastic faculty members have graciously volunteered to cover most of the classes vacated by those who had to withdraw.

TWO OF DEB HAGGERTY’S CLASSES are now filled by:
BEST-SELLING AUTHOR MICHELE CHYNOWETH 

Monday 2:30 – 3:15:
Getting Started (Fiction)
Tuesday 3:30 – 4:15:
It Takes One to Know One-Character Development

ONE OF DEB HAGGERTY’S CLASSES is now filled by:
BEST-SELLING AUTHOR ZOE MCCARTHY

Tuesday 2:30 – 3:15:
Writing in a Deep Point of View

SALLY APOKEDAK’S MAJOR MORNING CHILDREN’S FICTION CLASSES are now filled by:
BEST-SELLING AUTHOR JOYCE MAGNIN

Monday – Thursday 10:40 to 12:10:
First Chapter Essentials

VIE HERLOCKER’S MAJOR MORNING BEGINNERS’ CLASSES are now filled by:
BEST-SELLING AUTHOR MARSHA HUBLER

Monday – Thursday 10:40 to 12:10
: From Novice to Noticed

TWO OF MICHELLE LAZUREK’S CLASSES are now filled by:
BEST-SELLING AUTHOR DIANE STARK

Wednesday 1:30 – 2:15:
Writing for “Guideposts” and “All Creatures”
Thursday 1:30 to 2:15:
Writing the Profile Piece: Someone Else’s Story”

TWO OF MICHELLE LAZUREK’S CLASSES are now filled by:
BEST-SELLING AUTHOR JEANETTE LEVELLIE

Wednesday 2:30 – 3:15:
How to Start a Speaking Career
Thursday 2:30 – 3:15:
Humor Sells

PRAISE AND WORSHIP LEADER ALISON EVERILL’S RESPONSIBILITIES have been filled by:
GIFTED MUSICIAN KATHY BRITTAIN

Sunday’s Opening Session and Monday -Friday’s Morning Sessions: –
A short Praise and Worship Time

Wednesday 1:30 – 4:15
Music Writing Seminar (Sign-up required; still room in this class; call 800-598-5030 for more information)

The Montrose Conference Center staff and I are doing all humanly possible to keep everyone safe as we gather together next week. I look forward to seeing many of you at this writers’ conference. I believe God will richly bless and protect us all as we strive to serve Him by learning how to write better and for His glory.
Marsha
Director

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MCWC’s FACULTY SPOTLIGHT:
BEST-SELLING AUTHOR
TIFFANY STOCKTON 

Writers, please continue to pray for our conference. Susquehanna County is scheduled to go green this Friday, which is necessary for us to have our conference. So…as of today we are still planning to have our 2020 MCWC, and we will abide by all state guidelines to keep everyone safe.
Now, about our faculty member of the week:

Tiffany Stockton is an award-winning & best-selling author of 23 novels with 400,000 copies in print. She has a B.S. in education & a graduate of CLASS (Christian Leaders and Speakers Services). With 17 years in the writing industry, she has spoken at the Colorado and Philly Christian Writers Conferences, at ACFW, and has been an annual instructor on ACFW’s online conference. 

Tiffany’s Afternoon Classes


Tues. 2:30 to 3:15 

From Premise to Published

                                                          
It can be a daunting task to take an idea and believe it will one day become a published book, but it IS possible. Here are some key ways you can make sure you succeed in each step along the way.

Tues. 3:30 – 4:15

The Basics of Writing:  Training Wheels to Mt. Biking  

                 
Writing is not for the faint of heart. It takes dedication, persistence, and a never-give-up mindset. But there are also a few things that will help make the transition from training wheels to a two-wheeler and even a mountain bike in no time. And you don’t want to skip a step, or your freewheeling days might be a bit wobbly.

 

                                                   Wed. 2:30 – 3:15

Killing History or Bringing it to Life? 

                                             

Writing historical fiction requires a lot of work. But you don’t want to get so bogged down in research that you forget your story or your characters. And for contemporary, including historical tidbits could liven up your writing. Some tips and tricks for weaving history into your story or your nonfiction narrative and creating a vivid setting are included in this workshop.

 

Thurs. 2:30 – 3:15
                                                                                 

Your Story and your Personality  

Whether you’re writing fiction or non-fiction, your unique personality finds its way into your style, voice, and ability to persevere. In this workshop, you’ll learn about the 4 principal personality styles, as well as the strengths and weaknesses and how you can use both to your advantage. For those who write fiction or utilize fiction elements in their nonfiction, we’ll also discuss personality styles of characters and how to help your characters jump off the page.

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WRITERS WHO NEED TO LEARN MORE ABOUT WRITING/PUBLISHING/MARKETING:

If you plan to attend our conference but have not registered yet, please contact me at marshahubler@outlook.com for a brochure or go to https://bit.ly/2TmCDDf
to see the conference details AND register online.

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                     The 2020 MCWC Faculty Spotlight:
LITERARY AGENT FOR WORDWISE MEDIA SERVICES

                          MICHELLE LAZUREK 
                       
                      ATTENTION, WRITERS!
  One of our 2020 MCWC faculty members will be Wordwise Media Services agent Michelle S. Lazurek. Michelle is a multi-genre award-winning author, speaker, pastor’s wife and associate literary agent for Wordwise Media Services. Winner of the Golden Scroll Children’s Book of the Year, the Enduring Light Silver Medal and the Maxwell award for best non-fiction, she is a member of the Christian Author’s Network and the Advanced Writers and Speakers Association. She and her husband live in Coopersburg, Pennsylvania, with their two children, Caleb and Leah. 
                  MICHELLE’S CLASSES
             Wednesday Afternoon Classes               Do You Have a Platform? 
The word “platform” is used in writing, but few know what that means. Think of platform like a stage. It’s the place where you get your message out to the masses. But how does one do that in the midst of an overly-packed schedule?

In this workshop you will:
1. Understand the planks you need to build your platform
2. Identify which planks are right for you
3. Identify one way you can build your platform today

                 Writing for Early Readers

Many people want to write for children. But how do you write engaging content that not only tells a story but also keeps a young audience engaged despite the instant gratification world in which we live? In this workshop, Michelle will address the following aspects of children’s writing:

  • Why is writing children’s book so important?
  • Five tips to help you if you have a desire to write but don’t know where to start
  • Four ways to keep children engaged in the story
  • How to structure your book

                 Thursday Afternoon Classes

               From Conference to Contract:

     Turning Your One Sheet into a Stellar Proposal
You’ve gone to the workshops. You’ve met with publishers. They’ve shown interest in your book. So now what? In this workshop, Michelle shows you the five essential elements to flesh out your book idea and turn it into a proposal that captures a publisher’s attention. This workshop addresses:
An editor’s viewpoint on the process for sending a query, what to do with rejections, and the process from a go-ahead to a finished and published manuscript. This session will include hints and processes that can help every writer submit materials that can avoid rejection or extensive revision.

             
       The Twelve Essential Elements for Creative                                   Character Development

Purpose

To help writers create and fully develop characters for their next writing project; a fun and exciting way to develop characters through mind mapping.

Premise

Have a great character in mind for your next children’s book, short story, or YA novel, but don’t know how to start creating one? In this interactive workshop, Michelle helps you create a dynamic main character that will help jump start your next writing project. This workshop includes:

  • 12 Questions to ask when creating character profiles
  • Four rules on creating page turning main characters
  • Exercise in creating an actual character from start to finish

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Writers, please continue to pray with us that the COVID-19 situation will not cause us to cancel our 2020 MCWC conference.
I hope to see you in July!
Marsha, Director

To contact me for a brochure: marshahubler@outlook.com  or go to https://bit.ly/2XUGg4Z to see the conference details AND register online.

  

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2020 MCWC Faculty Spotlight – PA Magazine Editor Matt Holliday

One of our 2020 MCWC faculty members will be Chief Editor of the PA Magazine, Matthew K. Holliday.  Matt has been with that magazine since 1992. Although his title is “Editor,” his job includes all aspects of the publication process: working with contributors through coordinating production and marketing the magazine to potential subscribers. He enjoys working with regular and new contributors to obtain engaging material. He lives with his wife, teen son, and two golden retrievers in Mechanicsburg. Hobbies include traveling, wooden spoon carving, blacksmithing, kayaking, and camping.

MATT’S CLASSES

 Monday Afternoon Classes

                                Anatomy of a Suitable Article                           

Every magazine has needs and a style for its articles. We’ll dissect one or two articles that have appeared in Pennsylvania Magazine and discover the elements (subject/approach/writer/  photographer/process/submission/treatment that makes each article a winner. You can easily transfer this process to other publications too.

Photography 101

Make yourself more marketable by taking adequate photos. Have you wanted to sell stories locally, but they require you to submit photos with your text? Bring your camera or smart phone and learn the basics of taking images that are “good enough” for use in newspapers and small circulation magazines where the pay might be low, but the publication prospects are high. 

 Tuesday Afternoon Classes

                               From a Query to the Finished Article

An editor’s viewpoint on the process for sending a query, what to do with rejections, and the process from a go-ahead to a finished and published manuscript. This session will include hints and processes that can help every writer submit materials that can avoid rejection or extensive revision.        

                            How to Pitch & Contribute to a Magazine                                                             

Magazines require new material, every issue. Some are wide open for freelance work; many are not but pretend that they are. Learn how to analyze a magazine’s back issues, website, or how to make targeted phone calls or emails. Discover who receives queries, how to pitch the publication, what subjects to send, how to angle your story, when to send materials, etc. (Some publications are not worth your time; others can be goldmines.) Learn how to analyze which is which and go about the work of submitting materials for publication. 

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Writers, please continue to pray with us that the COVID-19 situation will not cause us to cancel our 2020 MCWC conference.
I hope to see you in July!
Marsha, Director

To contact me for a brochure: marshahubler@outlook.com  or go to https://bit.ly/2pdcYQC to see the conference details AND register online.

  

 

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The 2020 MCWC Faculty Spotlight

ELK LAKE PUBLISHING
CHIEF EDITOR

DEB HAGGERTY

One of our 2020 MCWC faculty members will be the chief editor and owner of Elk Lake Publishing, Plymouth, MA.
Deb Haggerty has been involved in Christian speaking and writing since 1995. She’s well known in the industry for her teaching at Christian writers’ conferences such as Glorieta, Blue Ridge Mountains, Greater Philadelphia, and Florida. She has been on staff for CLASSeminars and Florence Littauer’s Personality Training Seminars. Her seminars on communication, networking, and grace are popular with conferences and church groups alike. She also teaches writers “Tips and Tricks on Working with Editors and Publishers.”

 Since purchasing Elk Lake Publishing and incorporating, the company has gained a reputation for publishing positive books, encouraging new and experienced authors alike, and participating in the education of upcoming writers. Deb’s mission is to come alongside the authors God brings to her to ensure their work is produced in a positive and professional fashion.
Prior to her speaking and writing endeavors, Deb worked in corporate America for almost twenty-five years in a variety of assignments from sales, support staff, marketing, consulting, recruiting, and management. She even taught piano lessons for five years! All of these experiences have prepared her for running Elk Lake Publishing Inc.
Elk Lake Publishing is a traditional, royalty-paying publisher that acquires a variety of books in all genres of fiction and from children’s to adult. They also publish nonfiction “with a twist.” At this time, they’re looking for primarily fiction—especially mystery/suspense and contemporary women’s—and selected nonfiction, but no Amish, cowboy, memoirs, devotionals, Bible studies, or poetry.

DEB’S CLASSES

MONDAY 2:30 – 3:15
HOW TO GROW A TOPIC

What should we write about, where do we find topics, and how do we construct them?
When we decide to write or to speak, we first must decide what we want to say. We need to understand the parts of the book or speech and how to construct them. We need to understand research and know what makes us credible on the topic we’ve chosen.

TUESDAY 2:30 – 3:15
PUBLISHING 101:
FROM QUERY TO THE BOOK CONTRACT

We’ll review the publishing process from query to the finished book and everything in between.
Presenting yourself and your work successfully to an editor/publisher requires certain skills and documents. Ways to ensure you make that very important great first impression will be discussed along with tips and techniques to aid in the creative process. This is an interactive seminar with questions and discussion actively encouraged.

TUESDAY 3:30 – 4:15
PREPARING A PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATION

Speaking to groups is one of the best ways to sell books.Several studies have shown one of the best ways to sell books is back-of-the-room at a speech to a group. Many of us are terrified of the prospect of talking in front of people. This workshop will teach the steps to a professional presentation for even the faint of heart.

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Deb Haggerty had met several authors at last year’s MCWC whose work she loved and has contracted with those authors for a book deal. Don’t miss this year’s conference and plan to meet with her if you are writing the genres her company publishes. You might get that contract you’ve been working for.                    
I hope to see you in July!
Marsha, Director

To contact me for a brochure: marshahubler@outlook.com

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The 2020 MCWC Faculty Spotlight 
Social Media Guru Don Catlett

Writers, don’t miss the 31st annual Montrose Christian Writers Conference July 12th to the 17th! One of our faculty members will be social media guru Don Catlett, who is no stranger to MCWC.

Don truly enjoys sharing the tools and skills he has developed as a designer and marketing advisor over the past 20 years. As a freelance WordPress & social media consultant who is fascinated by content marketing, design, & technology, he transforms creative ideas into effective strategies. He helps his clients bring the right content to the right media, so it’s ready at the right time. Looking for someone to help you tell your story on the web? Come along as Don guides you through the journey.

DON’S CLASSES

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL MEDIA STORYTELLING
BLOGGING: THINGS I WISH I KNEW BEFORE STARTING
WORDPRESS QUICK START

 

Don will also have private blogging lessons ($20 for 45 minutes)
for anyone wanting to start a blog or update one. 

I hope to see you in July!
Marsha, Director

To contact me for a brochure: marshahubler@outlook.com

 

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Six Tips for Beginners

So, you’ve got your blank screen before you, you’ve got a tremendous idea for the “next great American novel,” you’ve got your dictionary, thesaurus, Elements of Style, and your Chicago Manual of Style ready. You rub your hands together, blow on your fingernails, and say, “Look out, world. Here comes brilliance!”

If you’ve never tried writing anything but eight-line poems or a letter to the newspaper’s editor once in a while, there are a few tips I’d like to share with you to help you not only write well but also get published. You might not be ready for a novel; perhaps, a 1200-word fiction story or article would be the best way to start.

Whether you’re determined to write a novel or start with shorter stuff, the tips I want to share will help. They’ll also be brief and to the point. In other words, I will not expound with long, convoluted sentences, which is one of the tips I have for you.

Tips to Help You Write Well:

1. Don’t write long, convoluted sentences. Write short, poignant sentences with very few flowery words and long descriptive paragraphs. Today’s readers won’t stand for your showing off for pages of narration that will bore them to death and cause them to set a match to your work.

2. Avoid the exclamation mark! One per page is often too many. Use clever words to emphasize emotion and action. Stay away from the exclamation mark!

3. Even if you’re writing fiction, be accurate. Do your homework. If you’re describing a fire scene, make sure you visit your local fire company and get all the details of what fire fighting is all about.

4. Stay away from fancy words. Go for simple active verbs, not descriptive adverbs and impressive adjectives. Instead of “She walked limply and lazily” try “She hobbled.”

5. Avoid figures of speech. They often distract your readers from the real core meaning of your sentence or paragraph. It just makes your reader think you were too lazy to put your own words together to write a clever line.

6. Try to stay in the background, like, invisible. A skillful writer will have his/her readers engrossed in the story, identifying with the character or theme and will not give the author a second thought. Not until the last page. Then the readers are free to exclaim, “Wow! What a story!” (And with the exclamation marks!)

Marsha Hubler
www.marshahubler.com
www.marshahubler.wordpress.com
Author of the Keystone Stables Series

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Start saving and make plans to join us next July 12th to the 17th at the 31st Montrose Christian Writers Conference in Montrose, PA. We have editors, agents, and best-selling authors on faculty to help you with any facet of your writing. :) 

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THE WRITER’S 14 COMMANDMENTS

Paper scroll and quill

Every writer should take himself seriously. Well, almost all the time. Once in a while, we have to turn off the computer, kick off our shoes, and have a good hearty laugh, especially if that last page of the manuscript just won’t “jive.”

There’s no better time to revert to a code of ethics (or non-ethics) to “lighten up.” Perhaps my 14 suggestions listed below will help ease the pain of your latest bout of writer’s block:

1. Thou shalt recite 100 times every day, “I’m a writer, I’m a writer.”

2. Thou shalt write every day, even if it is only I AM A WRITER 100 times.

3. Thou shalt not quit thy day job but shalt write by the light of the silvery moon.

4. If thou quittest thy day job, thou shalt be fully dressed, gargled, and at thy computer by 11 AM every day.

5. Thou shalt love thy computer and kiss it good morning every day.

6. Thou shalt not do other things before writing such as watching thy grass grow or brushing thy dog’s teeth.

7. Thou shalt query an editor at least once a year.

8. Thou shalt not smash thy computer after receiving thy first response from an editor.

9. Thou shalt not take out a full-page ad in the newspaper to announce thy first letter of acceptance.

10. Thou shalt make many copies of thy first letter of acceptance and frame them to hang in every room of thy dwelling.

11. Thou shalt join a critique group and attend writers’ conferences to hold thyself accountable.

12. Thou shalt not covet other writers’ million dollar advances.

13. Thou shalt be pleased with thy check of $30.

14. Thou shalt read books in the same genre as thou is writing to learn how to handle that genre.

There you go! With these 14 challenges instilled in your brain, you’re destined to become a best-selling author, so get back to work!

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DO YOU WRITE FICTION?

 

Me Know Everything!

If you want to write fiction, first you must decide for what age group you’ll write. Will you write for children or adults?

If you want to write for children, remember there are numerous subgenres and age groups in juvenile fiction.

Will you write for toddlers and preschoolers? Then you’re looking at a picture book often with fewer than 500 words that takes the child into his very small self-centered world. Unless you’re a trained artist, you probably shouldn’t attempt to do your own illustrations. Let the publishing company choose an illustrator from its stable of artists. He/she will do a fine job with your manuscript. Your main goal should be to write an irresistible story that the editor at the publishing company won’t be able to turn down.

Maybe you’d like to write a manuscript for a picture book styled after Dr. Seuss. Then study Dr. Seuss and his 60 books that are in print. Many of his books are 32 pages long with a manuscript that has several thousand words all cleverly written in perfect rhythm and meter poetry. It’s not as easy as you think.

Perhaps you’d like to write chapter books for six-to-ten-year-old kids. Here you’re looking at a book, usually without illustrations, that has about 64 to 80 pages (about 32,000 to 50,000 words). Your plot should take that reader from his familiar surroundings to worlds of fantasy and fun.

Then there are the subgenres for tweens and teens. You can write about any topic, any theme, and have well developed characters, plots, and subplots. How many words should you tackle? Anywhere from 30,000 to over 100,000 words. It’s not uncommon to see books of fantasy have at least 500 pages these days.

So get your creative juices flowing and start writing that children’s best-selling fiction story. Your kiddie audience awaits!

Marsha
www.marshahubler.com
www.marshahubler.wordpress.com
Author of the best-selling Keystone Stables Series

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Take a look at Marsha’s latest release:

TOMMI POCKETS

She wished she was a boy. But why?

https://amzn.to/2Zkx48L

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PLOT # 14

LOVE

Pride and Prejudice

Splash

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

My Fair Lady

If you’re considering writing a romance, take into consideration the following information that just might help you write a best seller:

  1. The prospect of love should always be met with a major obstacle. Your characters may want it, but they can’t have it for any variety of reasons. At least not right away.

2. The lovers are usually ill-suited in some way. They may come from different social classes or they may be physically unequal (one is blind or have special needs).

3. The first attempt to solve the obstacle is almost always thwarted. Success doesn’t come easily. Love must be proven by dedication and stick-to-it-iveness.

4.  As one observer once put it, love usually consists of one person offering the kiss and the other offering the cheek, meaning one lover is more aggressive in seeking love than the other. The aggressive partner is the seeker, who completes the majority of the action. The passive partner (who may want love just as much) still waits for the aggressive partner to overcome the obstacles. Either role can be played by either sex.

5.  Love stories don’t need to have happy endings. If you try to force a happy ending on a love story that clearly doesn’t deserve one, your audience will refuse it. True, Hollywood prefers happy endings, but some of the world’s best love stories (Anna Karenina, Romeo and Juliet, Love Story) are very sad.

6.  Concentrate on your main characters to make them appealing and convincing. Avoid the stereotypical lovers. Make your characters and their circumstances unique and interesting. Love is one of the hardest subjects to write about because it’s been written about so often, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be done well. You will have to feel deeply for your characters, though. If you don’t, neither will your readers.

7. Emotion is an important element in writing about love. Not only should you be convincing, but you should develop the full range of feelings: fear, loathing, attraction, disappointment, reunion, consummation, etc. Love has many feelings associated with it and you should be prepared to develop them according to the needs of your plot.

8.  Understand the role of sentiment and sentimentality in your writing and decide which is better for your story. If you’re writing a formula romance, you may want to use the tricks of sentimentality. If you’re trying to write a one-of-a-kind love story, you will want to avoid sentimentality and rely on true sentiment in your character’s feelings.

9.  Take the lovers through the full ordeal of love. Make sure they are tested (individually and collectively) and that they finally deserve the love they seek. Love is earned; it is not a gift. Love untested is not true love.

So, there you have it. If you’ve started a romance, do a checklist using these nine essential “ingredients” and see how many you’ve included to shape that novel into a page turner.

ALL INFORMATION COMPLIMENTS OF

Tobias, Ronald B.  20 Master Plots: And How to Build Them (Kindle Locations 1185-1207). F+W Media, Inc. Kindle Edition.

I highly recommend this book for anyone interested in writing fiction of any kind.

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COMING SOON!

MY LATEST RELEASE!

STRAIGHT FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH: A 60-Day Devotional for Kids

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