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Archive for September, 2010

Every writer should take himself seriously. Well, almost all the time. Once in a while, we have to turn off the computer, kick off our shoes, and have a good hearty laugh, especially if that last page of the manuscript just won’t “jive.”

There’s no better time to revert to a code of ethics (or non-ethics) to “lighten up.” Perhaps my 14 suggestions listed below will help ease the pain of your latest bout of writer’s block:

1. Thou shalt recite 100 times every day, “I’m a writer, I’m a writer.”

2. Thou shalt write every day, even if it is only I AM A WRITER 100 times.

3. Thou shalt not quit thy day job but shalt write by the light of the silvery moon.

4. If thou quittest thy day job, thou shalt be fully dressed, gargled, and at thy computer by 11 AM every day.

5. Thou shalt love thy computer and kiss it good morning every day.

6. Thou shalt not do other things before writing such as watching thy grass grow or brushing thy dog’s teeth.

7. Thou shalt query an editor at least once a year.

8. Thou shalt not smash thy computer after receiving thy first response from an editor.

9. Thou shalt not take out a full-page ad in the newspaper to announce thy first letter of acceptance.

10. Thou shalt make many copies of thy first letter of acceptance and frame them to hang in every room of thy dwelling.

11. Thou shalt join a critique group and attend writers conferences to hold thyself accountable.

12. Thou shalt not covet other writers’ million dollar advances.

13. Thou shalt be pleased with thy check of $30.

14. Thou shalt not quit thy day job but shalt write by the light of the silvery moon.

There you go! With these 14 challenges instilled in your brain, you’re destined to become a best-selling author, so get back to work!

Marsha Hubler
www.marshahubler.com
www.marshahubler.wordpress.com
Author of the Keystone Stables Series

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On Writing:

If you want to write fiction, first you must decide for what age group you’ll write. Will you write for children or adults?

If you want to write for children, please be advised that there are numerous subgenres and age groups in juvenile fiction.

Will you write for toddlers and preschoolers? Then you’re looking at a picture book with fewer than 500 words that takes the child into his very small self-centered world. Unless you’re a trained artist, you probably shouldn’t attempt to do your own illustrations. Let the publishing company choose an illustrator from its stable of artists. He/she will do a fine job with your manuscript. Your main goal should be to write an irresistible story that the editor at the publishing company won’t be able to turn down.

Maybe you’d like to write a manuscript for a picture book styled after Dr. Seuss. Then study Dr. Seuss and his 60 books that are in print. Many of his books are 32 pages long with a manuscript that has several thousand words all cleverly written in perfect rhythm and meter poetry. It’s not as easy as you think.

Perhaps you’d like to write chapter books for six-to-ten-year-old kids. Here you’re looking at a book, usually without illustrations, that has about 64 to 80 pages. Your plot should take that reader from his familiar surroundings to worlds of fantasy and fun.

Then there are the subgenres for tweens and teens. You can write about any topic, any theme, and have well developed characters, plots, and subplots. How many words should you tackle? Anywhere from 30,000 to over 100,000 words. It’s not uncommon to see books of fantasy have at least 500 pages these days.

So get your creative juices flowing and start writing that children’s best-selling fiction story. Your kiddie audience awaits!
Marsha Hubler
www.marshahubler.com
www.marshahubler.wordpress.com
Author of the Keystone Stables Series

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On Writing

It’s not too late to sign up for the Susquehanna Valley Writers Workshop in Lewisburg, PA, on Saturday, October 9th.

We have a terrific faculty lined up who are going to present 12 different workshops on a variety of genres:
Diana Flegal – Christian fiction agent
Joelle Dujardin – Highlights Magazine juvenile fiction editor
Lora Zill – editor of poetry booklet, TIME OF SINGING
Fran Fernandez – author of a ladies’ devotional
Nancy Christie – author of dozens of magazine articles and a book and a member of the American Society of Journalists and Authors
Cindy Herman – columnist for the “Daily Item” newspaper and writer of humorous articles for the “Inside Pennsylvania” magazine

Don’t miss this special writers day in the Susquehanna Valley in Pennsylvania. Contact me and I’ll email you a brochure and registration form without delay.

Marsha Hubler
www.marshahubler.com
www.marshahubler.wordpress.com
Author of the Keystone Stables Series

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