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The Dynamite 2019 Montrose Christian Writers Conference Faculty

Writers, if you’ve never attended a writers conference, this is the year to do it. We have a tremendous faculty coming who will be glad to sit down with you and review your work in private. Also, plan to attend over 45 classes that will teach you about fiction, nonfiction, poetry, songwriting, marketing, working with editors, finding an agent, and much more.

One of our editors is Roseanna White, (also an author), whose company WhiteFire is looking for juvenile fiction and adult fiction.

Another faculty member is Lora Zill. Lora teaches writing and critical analysis at Gannon University and creative writing for Allegheny College’s arts programs for gifted middle and high school students. She is also a teaching artist with the PA Council on the Arts, conducting artist residencies in public schools and training teachers in arts infused curriculum. Lora edits and publishes a poetry journal, Time Of Singing, and speaks at writing, education, and arts conferences. She has co-authored a chapter on creativity in an academic textbook and her award-winning poetry and nonfiction have been published widely. She is completing a book about feeling God’s pleasure through creative expression and blogs at www.thebluecollarartist.com.

The rest of our faculty include:

Dan Brownell – editor with Today’s Christian Living

Rebecca Irwin Diehl – editor  with The Secret Place

Alison Everill – Praise and Worship Leader

Deb Haggerty – publisher and editor-in-chief of Elk Lake Publishing

Pam Halter – award-winning children’s book author

Jim Hart – agent with Hartline Literary Agency

Gloria Penwell-Holtzlander – acquis. editor with Bold Vision Books

Jeanette Levellie – award-winning author

Elaine W. Miller – international speaker and best-selling author

Linda Rondeau – editor with Elk Lake Publishing

Gayle Roper – award-winning author

Donna Smith – editor of the blog “Almost An Author”

Shawn Smucker – award-winning author

Kim Sponaugle – award-winning illustrator

Diane Stark – award-winning author

Jim Watkins – award-winning author

Please check more details about this faculty at https://www.facebook.com/MontroseChristianWriters/ For more details about the conference and registration forms, please go to http://www.montrosebible.org

Register now, gather your tote bag full of your work, and get ready for July 14th. I’ll look for you then at Montrose!

Marsha, Director

 

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ALISON EVERILL – MCWC’S NEW PRAISE AND WORSHIP LEADER

I know many former MCWC conferees and faculty members, who plan to return this July, have been wondering if we’ll have a daily Praise and Worship time at Montrose this year since Donna and Conrad Kreiger retired last year.

We’ve been praying that God would lead us to the right person(s) to continue the tradition of our God-honoring praise sessions that have been so greatly appreciated.

The Montrose Bible Conference director, Jim Fahringer, recommended a gal from Georgia, whom he said he’s had at the conference grounds for several other events and highly recommends her. Let’s get to meet ALISON EVERILL:

Alison Everill:  began her music ministry as a childhood church musician. From then until now, she has chronicled her faith journey through her beautiful music. From the moment Alison sits at the piano to express her worship for Jesus through one of her original worship songs, listeners are drawn in to hear the passion in her voice and sense her devotion to the Lord through her

powerful lyrics that speak volumes not only about her music but also her life. She composes her own music and powerfully delivers each Christ-centered message. She has co-written and published two songs on Dove Award-winning artist Babbie Mason’s latest record project and has had several songs signed with the Gaither Publishing Company.

 

Alison will also teach four workshops for music lovers who have written their own music or would like to know how:

SONGWRITING
Alison Everill    4 Sessions:   2:30 – 4:15    Wed. – Thurs.

Where do I begin? Finding good song ideas, coming up with your “hook,” starting

strong. What are the Nuts and Bolts of crafting a good song? Rhyme scheme, matching

syllables, word choice, song structure. How do I construct a professional lyric sheet and get my song publish-ready? You’ll also have an opportunity to share a song you have written with the group and receive feedback. Bring a demo if you have one and/or lyric multiple lyric sheets. We’ll work on any songs you have in progress using the tools we have learned and possibly write some originals! We’ll be writing during this time together!

 So come with a notebook, ready to create!  

Songwriters and everyone else planning to come, all the information and registration forms are on the website, https://bit.ly/2GvaC6s . Although the online registration is not ready, you can scroll down to the REGISTRATION FORM option and click on it. Then print the registration form to complete and snail mail it to the Montrose Conference Center office. The hard copy brochures will also be ready any day, which, if you are on our mailing list, you should receive in the mail very soon.

MEET DEB HAGGERTY -PUBLISHER AND CHIEF EDITOR OF ELK LAKE PUBLISHING

Deb Haggerty has been involved in Christian speaking and writing since 1995. She is well known in the industry for her teaching at Christian writers’ conferences such as Glorieta, Blue Ridge Mountains, Greater Philadelphia, and Florida. She has been on staff for CLASSeminars and Florence Littauer’s Personality Training Seminars. Her seminars on communication, networking, and grace are popular with conferences and church groups alike. She also teaches writers “Tips and Tricks on Working with Editors and Publishers.”

Deb took a hiatus from speaking when she was diagnosed and treated for breast cancer in 2000. Led to stay home and care for her family, she soldiered through the death of her mother-in-law, her stepson, and her mother. In 2014, she began a freelance editing business and also began editing for Elk Lake. In 2015, the owner asked her to come on board as Vice President of Acquisitions and Management. When he could no longer run the company due to health issues, Deb and her husband bought the assets of the company in 2016.

Since purchasing Elk Lake Publishing and incorporating, the company has gained a reputation for publishing positive books, encouraging new and experienced authors alike, and participating in the education of upcoming writers. Deb’s mission is to come alongside the authors God brings to her to ensure their work is produced in a positive and professional fashion.

Prior to her speaking and writing endeavors, Deb worked in corporate America for almost twenty-five years in a variety of assignments from sales, support staff, marketing, consulting, recruiting, and management. She even taught piano lessons for five years! All of these experiences have prepared her for running Elk Lake Publishing Inc.

Elk Lake Publishing is a traditional, royalty-paying publisher that acquires a variety of books in all genres of fiction and from children’s to adult. They also publish nonfiction “with a twist.” At this time, they’re looking for primarily fiction—especially mystery/suspense and contemporary women’s—and selected nonfiction, but no Amish, cowboy, memoirs, devotionals, Bible studies, or poetry.

Register for MCWC by June 15th and request guidelines for emailing your manuscript.

 $40.00 per critique

DEB HAGGERTY (Publisher/Editor Elk Lake) – juvenile & adult fiction (LIMIT: 5)

 

DEB’S WORKSHOPS

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Networking: Necessity or Nuisance

Networking is an attitude. We must always keep in mind those to whom we can refer others. In order to receive the benefits of networking, we must first give. Effective networking techniques are a necessity in successfully marketing ourselves and our work, and when implemented, reduce the nuisance factor of making new contacts. Effective networking aids us in finding new associates, as well as in maintaining our professional relationships.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Tips & Tricks for Working with Editors and Publishers

Working with editors and publishers can be foreboding. This workshop will give you tips on how to work with us effectively. (Chocolate always is helpful.) We’ll discuss the how-to’s of proposals and style sheets along with lots of tips on self-editing and formatting our work. This is an interactive session with questions and comments welcome. (And did I mention chocolate?) You’ll come away from this session realizing editors and publishers are people just like you—ready, willing, and able to help you on this publication process.

July is just a short TWO months away. Register now and make plans to join us for a writers’ conference that will give you all the information you need to get your work published! 😊 I hope to meet you there on July 14th!    

Marsha, Director                   

 

FACULTY MEMBER REBECCA IRWIN DIEHL

Editorial director of Judson Press & ordained to the publishing ministries in 2009, she loves working with authors to bring their words to the printed page. She’s worked in publishing since earning her undergrad. degree in English-writing in 1995. Completing a master’s in theological studies, she “found an ideal niche in Christian publishing, where her love of words meets her passion for God’s Word.”

REBECCA’S WORKSHOPS

(Rebecca will be at Montrose Monday and Tuesday, July 15th and 16th only)

 

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Writing Dramatic Dialogue

Learn some tips that are as useful in fiction as they are on stage! This class will feature some excerpts from the classics, the contemporary, and even from the class. Dissect the dialog and discover what works and why. Great for script writers, fiction writers, screenwriters, and even writers of memoir or biography.

The Art of Self-Editing

Getting your ideas on paper (or hard drive) is half the battle—but it’s only the first half. Learn the art of rewriting and self-editing to ensure that your manuscript is as strong as it can possibly be—without bogging down in the quicksand of overwriting. Covers a range of editorial issues, including organization, concept development, syntax, style, voice, and audience.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

From Query to the 1st Royalty Check

A thorough behind-the-scenes overview of the publishing process from the time a concept is proposed through the first year of sales, including manuscript review and development, production and design, and front list marketing and promotions.

Publishing your Passion 

It’s not enough to have something to say; you have to say something people need to hear—and then say it in such a way that they will listen! How to develop a unique and compelling “package” for your passion as a Christian writer. Learn how to do a market analysis and identify both an audience and a need that you are able to meet, not just with God’s Word but with your own words.

**************************************************************

Writers, all the information and registration forms are on the website, https://bit.ly/2GvaC6s . Although the online registration is not ready, you can scroll down to the REGISTRATION FORM option and click on it. Then print the registration form to complete and snail mail it to the Montrose Conference Center office. The hard copy brochures will also be ready any day, which, if you are on our mailing list, you should receive in the mail very soon.

July is just a short three months away. Register now and make plans to join us for a writers’ conference that will give you all the information you need to get your work published! 😊 I hope to meet you there on July 14th!                                   

THE 2019 MONTROSE CHRISTIAN WRITERS CONFERENCE IS ONLY THREE MONTHS AWAY!

Authors! Make your plans to attend the 2019 Montrose Christian Writers Conference from July 14th to the 19th, or just come for a day or two. (Per diem rates are available.) Watch for online registration coming soon at www.montrosebible.org.

From now until July, look for posts featuring one faculty member in each post. Then set your sights on the faculty members with whom you’d like to meet and show your writing skills at the conference. Who knows? You might go home with a promised contract for some of your work.

FACULTY MEMBER DAN BROWNELL

Dan Brownell, editor of Today’s Christian Living, Today’s Pastor, and Smart Retailer, is a graduate of Liberty University with a bachelor’s degree in English. He taught junior high and high school English at an international Christian school in Uijongbu, South Korea, before entering the publishing field. Besides editing magazines, he has worked as an educational test writer and editor, copywriter, proposal writer, book editor, and book acquisitions editor. He is married to his sweetheart, Cathy, whom he met in college. They have two children — Elizabeth and Josh — a dog, and according to Dan — way too many cats.

DAN’S WORKSHOPS

(Dan will be at Montrose Wednesday and Thursday, July 17th and 18th only)

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

 Nonfiction Book Proposals Part 1 – The Publisher’s Proposal Process

Find out how book publishers decide what gets published and what doesn’t. Understanding what goes on behind the scenes can give you great insight and a big advantage. You’ll learn not only what publishers are looking for, but why. Although Dan is currently a magazine editor, he spent nearly five years as a book acquisitions editor for a major book publisher.

Nonfiction Book Proposals Part 2 – Researching and Writing a Book Proposal

Detailed research and concise, persuasive writing are crucial to submitting an effective book proposal. Discover how to do the background research necessary to attract an acquisition editor’s attention and interest. Also learn how to present a polished proposal with the right information.

THURSDAY AFTERNOON 

Five Tips on Selling a Magazine Article

Editors receive far more articles than they have room or budget to print, which can make it hard for even an excellent article to stand out among the competition. Fortunately, there are some simple things you can do — that no one does — to move your article to the top of the pile. Learn the secrets of winning over an editor with your article.

Print and Digital Publishing Photo Requirements

Publishing is placing more and more emphasis on the visual impact of stories. Your ability to provide usable photos can make the difference in selling an article. This class provides some basic information you need to know about photo specs and expectations for both digital and print applications. Dan has worked with approximately 100,000 photos and images in his 20-year career as a book and magazine editor.

 

FACULTY MEMBER REBECCA IRWIN DIEHL

Editorial director of Judson Press & ordained to the publishing ministries in 2009, she loves working with authors to bring their words to the printed page. She’s worked in publishing since earning her undergrad. degree in English-writing in 1995. Completing a master’s in theological studies, she “found an ideal niche in Christian publishing, where her love of words meets her passion for God’s Word.”

REBECCA’S WORKSHOPS

(Rebecca will be at Montrose Monday and Tuesday, July 15th and 16th only) 

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Writing Dramatic Dialogue

Learn some tips that are as useful in fiction as they are on stage! This class will feature some excerpts from the classics, the contemporary, and even from the class. Dissect the dialog and discover what works and why. Great for script writers, fiction writers, screenwriters, and even writers of memoir or biography.

The Art of Self-Editing

Getting your ideas on paper (or hard drive) is half the battle—but it’s only the first half. Learn the art of rewriting and self-editing to ensure that your manuscript is as strong as it can possibly be—without bogging down in the quicksand of overwriting. Covers a range of editorial issues, including organization, concept development, syntax, style, voice, and audience.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

From Query to the 1st Royalty Check

A thorough behind-the-scenes overview of the publishing process from the time a concept is proposed through the first year of sales, including manuscript review and development, production and design, and front list marketing and promotions.

Publishing your Passion

It’s not enough to have something to say; you have to say something people need to hear—and then say it in such a way that they will listen! How to develop a unique and compelling “package” for your passion as a Christian writer. Learn how to do a market analysis and identify both an audience and a need that you are able to meet, not just with God’s Word but with your own words.

************

Watch for the online registration to be ready any day now. We’ll also soon have hard copy brochures. Let me know if you would like one snailmailed to you.

Marsha

Director MCWC

 

 

 

WRITERS, DO YOU WANT TO IMPROVE YOUR WRITING?

 

DO YOU WANT THE ENCOURAGEMENT OF OTHER WRITERS?

 

  MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

 

2019 Susquehanna Valley Writers Annual Luncheon

SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2019

 

NOTHING HELPS A WRITER GET OUT OF THE WINTER DOLDRUMS LIKE

 

FELLOWSHIPPING WITH OTHER WRITERS.

ATTENTION: Writers in Central PA

join us for the

SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY WRITERS LUNCHEON

Saturday, March 16, 2019

10:45 a.m. (registration)
11:00 to 1:30 p.m.

CARRIAGE CORNER RESTAURANT

257 E. Chestnut Street, Mifflinburg, PA 17844

(Along Route 45)

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Guest Speaker: Annette Whipple, highly recommended by best-selling author Jeanette Windle,  is an author living in Oxford, PA, with her husband and three children. She strives to inspire a sense of wonder in people while exciting them about the world around them. When she’s not writing or visiting schools, Annette enjoys reading a good book and snacking on warm chocolate chip cookies. Connect on Facebook and Instagram at @AnnetteWhippleBooks and Twitter @AnnetteWhipple. Learn more about Annette, her books, and her presentations at http://www.AnnetteWhipple.com.

On March 16th, she’ll be presenting:

The Creative Calling – Session One

Who are you? You are a writer and so much more. Some of us care for children and aging parents. Some of us work additional jobs and volunteer in our communities. We have ideas to write but haven’t had time to write them. Or maybe we feel guilty when we take time away from our other priorities to write. Learn practical tips as we consider our personal calling without neglecting our commitments.

Skip the Pitch: Work-for-Hire Writing Assignments – Session Two

Want to be traditionally published? Stop pitching publishers and get paid to write informational books and other materials for children (grades K-12). If you enjoy learning and writing about new topics, break into the publishing world or bring in more income by writing for the educational market. This workshop explores a variety of writing opportunities with the educational market.

Session One: 11:00-11:45 AM
Lunch: 11:45-12:45 PM
Session Two: 12:45-1:30

Cost: $25

Includes: Soup and Salad Bar, Beverage, Gratuity, and Speaker Honorarium

If you are an author, feel free to bring your books to sell on the

Authors’ Books Table

Registration Deadline: Saturday, March 9, 2019

For the details to register go to: https://susquehannavalleywritersworkshop.wordpress.com/

PLOTS #19 and #20

ASCENSION AND DESCENSION

The Godfather

The Elephant Man

Elmer Gantry

Citizen Cane

Poster showing two women in the bottom left of the picture looking up towards a man in a white suit in the top right of the picture. "Everybody's talking about it. It's terrific!" appears in the top right of the picture. "Orson Welles" appears in block letters between the women and the man in the white suit. "Citizen Kane" appears in red and yellow block letters tipped 60° to the right. The remaining credits are listed in fine print in the bottom right.

Poster photo compliments of Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizen_Kane)

We’ve finally gotten to the last two of twenty fiction plots from which writers may choose. If you’re interested in writing about a main character who either

  1. The focus of your story should be about a single character.
  2. That character should be strong-willed, charismatic, and seemingly unique. All of your other characters will revolve around this one.
  3. At the heart of your story should be a moral dilemma. This dilemma tests the character of your protagonist/ antagonist, and it is the foundation for the catalyst of change in her character.
  4. Character and event are closely related to each other. Anything that happens should happen because of the main character. He/she is the force that affects events, not the reverse. (This isn’t to say that events can’t affect your main character; however, we are more interested in how he/she acts upon the world than how the world acts upon him/her.)
  5. Try to show your character as he/she was before the major change that altered his/her life so we have a basis of comparison.
  6. Show your character progressing through successive changes as a result of events. If it is a story about a character who overcomes horrible circumstances, show the nature of that character while he/she still suffers under those circumstances. Then show us how events change his/her nature during the course of the story. Don’t “jump” from one character state to another; that is, show how your character moves from one state to another by giving us his/her motivation and intent.
  7. If your story is about the fall of a character, make certain the reasons for the fall are a result of character and not gratuitous circumstances. The reason for a rise may be gratuitous (the character wins $ 27 million in LottoAmerica) but not the reasons for his/her fall. The reasons for a character’s ability to overcome adversity should also be the result of his/her character, not some contrivance.
  8. Try to avoid a straight dramatic rise or fall. Vary the circumstances in the character’s life: Create rises and falls along the way. Don’t just put your character on a rocket to the top and then crash. Vary intensity of the events, too. It may seem for a moment that your character has conquered his/her flaw, when in fact, it doesn’t last long. And vice versa. After several setbacks, the character finally breaks through (as a result of her tenacity, courage, belief, etc.).
  9. Always focus on your main character. Relate all events and characters to your main character. Show us the character before, during, and after the change.

A FINAL CHECKLIST Give yourself a little quiz to see if you’re ready to write your best-selling novel:

As you develop your plot, consider the following questions. If you can answer all of them, you have a grasp of what your story is about. But if you can’t answer any of them, you still don’t know what your story is and what you want to do with it.

1. In fifty words, what is the basic idea for your story?

2. What is the central aim of the story? State your answer as a question. For example, “Will Othello believe Iago about his wife?”

3. What is your protagonist’s intent? (What does she want?)

4. What is your protagonist’s motivation? (Why does she want what she is seeking?)

5. Who and/ or what stands in the way of your protagonist?

6. What is your protagonist’s plan of action to accomplish her intent?

7. What is the story’s main conflict? Internal? External?

8. What is the nature of your protagonist’s change during the course of the story?

9. Is your plot character-driven or action-driven?

10. What is the point of attack of the story? Where will you begin?

11. How do you plan to maintain tension throughout the story?

12. How does your protagonist complete the climax of the story?

So, there you have it. The wrap-up of about 16 of my blogs over the last year, blogs dedicated to writing good fiction. I want to again remind you that all the information has been taken from:

Tobias, Ronald B (2011-12-15). 20 Master Plots (p. 273). F+W Media, Inc. Kindle Edition.

I recommend this book to anyone interested in writing good fiction.

PLOT # 18

WRETCHED EXCESS

Mildred Pierce

The Lost Weekend

Adam, Eve, and the Serpent

Picture compliments of Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_of_Eden

The holidays are over, and if you’re like me, you want to “get back in the groove of life” and face the new year head on. However, with sugar plum fairies possibly still dancing in your head, you might be struggling to get back into the writing mode. Maybe these tips about writing fiction will help.

If you want to tackle this difficult fiction subgenre, do your homework and study best sellers before you start. A “wretched excess” plot involves all kinds of drama and some difficult scenes. But there are some issues you need to address with much care as you write. It’s definitely a character-driven piece of work:

  1. Wretched excess is generally about the psychological decline of a character.
  2. Base the decline of your character on a character flaw.
  3. Present the decline of your character in three phases: how he/she is before events start to change him/her; how he/she is as he/she successively deteriorates; and what happens after events reach a crisis point, which forces him/her either to give in completely to his/her flaw (tragedy) or to recover from it.
  4. Develop your character so that his/her decline evokes sympathy. Don’t present him/her as a raving lunatic.
  5. Take particular care in the development of your character, because the plot depends on your ability to convince the audience that he/she is both real and worthy of their feelings for him/her.
  6. Avoid melodrama. Don’t try to force emotion beyond what the scene can carry.
  7. Be straightforward with information that allows the reader to understand your main character. Don’t hide anything that will keep your reader from being empathetic.
  8. Most writers want the audience to feel for the main character, so don’t make your character commit crimes out of proportion of our understanding of who and what he/she is. It’s hard to be sympathetic with a person who’s a rapist or a serial murderer.
  9. At the crisis point of your story, move your character either toward complete destruction or redemption. Don’t leave him/her swinging in the wind because your reader will definitely not be satisfied.
  10. Action in your plot should always relate to character. Things happen because your main character does (or does not) do certain things. The cause and effects of your plot should always relate either directly or indirectly to your main character.
  11. Don’t lose your character in his/her madness. Nothing beats personal experience when it comes to this plot. If you don’t understand the nature of the excess yourself (having experienced it), be careful about having your character do things that aren’t realistic for the circumstances.
  12. As I said before, do your homework, and fully understand the nature of the excess you want to write about.

Wow! That’s a head full of ideas and information, isn’t it? If you’re brave enough to tackle this “wretched excess,” God bless you as you work on your best seller!

ALL INFORMATION COMPLIMENTS OF

Tobias, Ronald B.  20 Master Plots: And How to Build Them (Kindle Locations 1185-1207). F+W Media, Inc. Kindle Edition.

I highly recommend this book for anyone interested in writing fiction of any kind.

*****

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